minutes per mile blog

failure

After an undefeated season, Team EZ Pass fell short in the league championship last night. When I woke up today I thought the memory was just a nightmare but I guess this photo proves that it really did happen. NOOOOOOoooooooo!!!!

IMG_0121The games were extremely close — we lost by 2 (the minimum you’re allowed to lose by) in both games which both went into overtime. The stakes were high and as you can see in the picture above, we were truly devastated ;).

A pitcher of Modelo helped soothe the pain and I think we will all recover (though it might take a long time and a few more drinks).

IMG_0118Thanks for a great season, EZ Pass! I can’t wait to play with you again!

On my (bike) ride home from the game, I started thinking about progress and failure. I know many people who run 2-3 marathons a year — and sometimes when I talk to them after a race, they’re really upset with their finish time; barely even proud of their race at all. I also coach trainees who are embarrassed by how “slow” they are, who think that running a race at their pace makes them less accomplished than other, faster, runners. When I finished the Southern Plunge Marathon with a time 5 minutes slower than my goal, I was a bit bummed.

Side note: Speaking of bikes, this beauty has been parked on 15th and H street the past couple weeks and I’m in love with it. I just ordered Betty a new seat because I was so inspired by this vintage gem!DSC02662

But anyways, back to failure.

I know that you should always push yourself, train harder, and work to get faster — but I think it’s also very easy to lose sight of the achievements you make while training and on race day. When I’m disappointed with a marathon time, or talk to friends who are disappointed with their race time, I try to remember to step back and look at the situation from a normal’s person’s perspective. A normal person would say, “Hello there, crazy. You just ran a marathon. That is incredible.” They wouldn’t care whether I ran an 8:30 mile or an 8:22 mile. A marathon, a half marathon, a 5k, one mile — these are all accomplishments and we should be proud. Numbers help keep you on track but they’re certainly not everything.

So I’m still proud of Team EZ Pass. I’m sure this failure is fleeting and we shall return VICTORIOUS come another season. !!!

A small victory today, already: Getting out of bed.
DSC02680I knew I would get to see my fiance if I went to CrossFit and so boom, I was out the door. DSC02683

No it’s not 1972, I just felt like cross-processing all my photos today to feel old school. This workout, for example, made me feel like I was about 97 years old. All of the joints and muscles are like, what the heck.DSC02682And that’s how you know it’s going to be a good day. Keep on accomplishing, everyone!

  • How do you handle failure?
  • What’s the last thing you bought on Amazon? (I buy something like every day)
  • Do you collect vintage things or antiques?

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